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Charlie Chan, Movies' #1 Sleuth
Topic Started: Sep 4 2005, 09:44 AM (14,205 Views)
Laughing Gravy
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The Charlie Chan Chanthology (Warners, $69.96)

Charlie Chan made his film debut in a (now-lost) Pathé serial, House Without a Key, in 1926. Fox soon acquired the property, and in 1931 starred Warner Oland as the Hawaiian-based Chinese sleuth. Eight years and 16 films later, Oland died and was replaced by Sidney Toler, who carried on for another 11 films until Fox dropped the series in 1942. Toler took his ol’ bad self and the series over to Monogram in 1944, and starred in 11 more Chans before he died in 1947. Roland Winters assumed the role for the last half dozen films, and the series ended in 1949 after 18 years and 44 films.

The first six Monogram releases have been dropped on the market in a DVD set called The Charlie Chan Anthology, and are also available separately.

The Chan films have lately come under scrutiny for their racism; obviously, they are a product of their times, and I don’t find them particularly offensive, but then, I’ve seen a lot worse in old movies. And I’m not Chinese, either. On the other hand, they don’t seem to come under scrutiny for what really ails them: most of them are as dull as the finish on a ’49 John Deere tractor. Once a fixture on the Late, Late Show, the Chan films are guaranteed to infect even the most rampant insomniacs with narcolepsy.

Charlie Chan in the Secret Service (1944, directed by Phil Rosen of Return of the Ape Man fame, if you can call it fame), the first of the Monogram Chans, has exactly one good moment, and it’s the opening scene of the picture: a supply ship is blown out of the water. It’s obviously a cheap Monogram model in a tub of water, though, but before our minds can finish registering the dismay of “Uh-oh, typical Monogram cheesy special effects,” the camera pulls back and we see that it’s REALLY a cheap model in a tub of water, part of a scientist’s experiment. Before our minds can finish registering, “Hey, that was funny, maybe this movie’s gonna be pretty good,” though, the film proper begins, and it doesn’t take long for THAT hope to be dashed.

The scientist has soon dropped dead, and it looks like natural causes, except that his plans for a new torpedo have vanished. The house is sealed off, the suspects are quarantined, and honorable Chan, Charlie, is brought in to shuffle around aimlessly for an hour until the film ends. Incidentally, the problem with these Chan films can be seen early in the picture: once Charlie is given his assignment and says goodbye to his son and daughter, any other director would’ve faded to Charlie’s arrival at the house. Well, no, not when we’ve got 65 minutes to fill, buster. Instead, we see Mr. Chan leave his office, go to the elevator, walk across the lobby, shuffle down the stairs, cross the sidewalk, say something to the cab driver, open the cab door, enter the cab, shut the cab door, drive away in the cab, arrive at the house, get out of the cab, nod to the gatekeeper, walk up the driveway, and arrive at the house, all to swelling dramatic music. The transition takes no less than one minute and 34 seconds (I timed it; believe you me, you’ll be doing a lot of clock-watching during this picture).

Noting the thinness of the plot and the need for additional padding, the screenwriter gave us not one, not two, but three comedy relief characters. Marianne Quon, who is adorable but makes her only appearance in the series, is Charlie’s daughter Iris, while Benson Fong is son Tommy (taking over the role of pesky would-be-helpful doofus son from Victor Sen Yung). Most notable of all is Mantan Moreland, debuting in the series as chauffer Birmingham Brown. Moreland would be around for several more installments, but alas, he cannot save the film. Neither can Charlie Chan’s famous pithy comments; he needed a better writer than he got here. About the best he can muster is, “Detective without curiosity like glass eye at keyhole: no good.” Mainly, he talks in telegram speak: “Must call cab. Go hotel.” I think he got the same elocution lessons as Johnny Weissmuller.

In case you’re wondering how I managed to stay awake through the entire 3 and ½ hour running time of the film * checking the box * sorry, 65 minutes, I’ll tell you: I got up in the morning, took in a little exercise, made a strong pot of Earl Grey tea (extra caffeine), and sat in the most uncomfortable chair in the house. Even at that, I had problems. For the next film, I considered stitching my eyelashes to my forehead.

Regular as clockwork, three months after the initial Monogram entry in the Charlie Chan series, a new installment arrived in theatres. Charlie Chan in the Chinese Cat (yes, according to the credits, that’s the title, weird and kinky as it sounds) is better than its predecessor, but worse than anything else you can imagine, even if you can imagine having a rotten molar removed through your aural canal, sans anesthetic.

Wealthy Mr. Manning is shot dead while he’s playing with himself, and he… that is, while he’s playing chess with himself, and he removes all the playing pieces save for the bishop before he dies. Is that a clue, or was he just fussy? We don’t know, but the police investigating the murder soon get as bored as we are and drop the case. Six months later, a famous criminologist writes a book based on the crime, and throws suspicion on the wealthy widow. The wealthy widow’s daughter asks Charlie Chan to solve the case and clear her mom. Nothing happens after that, and an hour later we can all go home. You’ve heard of “whodunits”? Well, the producers of the Chan films created their own genre: “whothehellcares”.

Benson Fong is back as Charlie’s pesky #3 son, whom Charlie insults at every turn: “Fear you make weak limb, to which no family tree may point with pride,” the great detective tells him, sounding for all the world like a bunch of words written out on scraps of paper and selected randomly from a hat. At least Mantan Moreland has a better turn than the previous film. He’s still Birmingham Brown, now a cabbie in search of the five bucks Chan has stiffed him on a previous fare. He keeps running into the twin brother of one of the murder victims, whom he mistakes as the haunt of the dead man: “Instead of spots, I got CORPSES in front o’ muh eyes!”

I’d tell you more about this film, except I’m sad to report that my streak of staying awake all the way through a Chan film ended at one.

Next up is Black Magic (1944), and guess what? It’s not too bad, actually.
Mr. And Mrs. Bonner are a couple of spiritualists who specialize in raising the dead at séances, and after their latest venture, Mr. Bonner is going to need a little raising himself. Thanks to the happenstance of Charlie Chan’s daughter, Frances Chan (portrayed by an actress named Frances Chan, and what are the odds of THAT) being present, Charlie is soon hot on the trail of the murderer.

This film is a big improvement over the initial two films in the Monogram series, and it’s easy to figure out why: Charlie Chan himself does not make an appearance until past the 9:30 mark (of a 67 minute feature). That gives the audience (that’s us) plenty of time to actually get involved in the shenanigans before the Honolulu Humdinger arrives on the scene to put everybody to sleep.

In this case, besides phony spiritualists, you’ve got magic tricks, hypnotism, people jumping off of buildings, disappearing bullets (that is, they disappear AFTER they enter the body), and a white handkerchief that occasionally levitates over Mr. Chan’s head. Oh, and Mantan Moreland is back as Birmingham Brown, dodging spooks and assisting Charlie’s honorable daughter to help her pop crack the case. The list of suspects is perhaps a little more interesting than in the previous two films, although the cast is not (Jacqueline DeWit, Joseph Crehan, and Helen Beverly unlikely to set classic movie lovers’ hearts aflutter). Once again, by the way, Charlie’s famous pithy comments are held to a minimum – the poor guy really has to get better writers! Still, it’s a nice little B-movie and revives my hopes for the remainder of the series – and indeed, for all humanity.

NOTE: Yes, based on the original Monogram Pictures title card, the film is entitled Black Magic. It is not Charlie Chan in Black Magic (thank goodness) as imdb.com states. It was later re-released as Meeting at Midnight (charliechan.net has a pic of the title card showing that title, and “Monogram Pictures” is nowhere to be found on it, meaning that was a re-release title). The MGM DVD (and isn’t it ironic to think that MGM now distributes former Monogram product!) says Meeting at Midnight on the packaging, although the blurb on the back correctly says the film was “released in 1944 as Black Magic.” The DVD, however, has the original (and quite attractive) Black Magic title card, although it is superimposed at the bottom (incorrectly) that the film was “originally released as Meeting at Midnight.” Sheesh. You’d think SOMEBODY could keep these things straight!

Anyway, it’s a beautiful, crisp print and looks terrific, and even has the “Buy War Bonds and Stamps” ad on the end. If you want to try a Chan film, you could do worse (boy, could you) than this one.

The Jade Mask (1945) is next, chronologically, and I have to admit, I’m totally baffled by this loony mystery. None of it seems to make sense, the ending is ridiculous, the murderer hangs around to kill more people for no apparent reason, all of the suspects seem to be certifiably nuts, and the mask is made of plaster, not jade. I felt as if I were watching a Mel Brooks parody of a Charlie Chan picture. It’s no less dull than the other films in the Monogram Chan series, but it’s a whole lot daffier.

A scientist is murdered, and Chan is called in to solve the case. (I’ve decided to use that sentence to describe the plot of EVERY Chan film I review, inasmuch as that IS the plot of every Chan film I’ve seen.) This scientist had invented a poison gas the government wants (a fact which, frankly, made me nervous). But wait, he’s also invented some puppets. And he’s working on a robot. And I’m fairly certain that mention is also made that he’s close to perfecting edible Slinkys. Anyway, he dies from a poison dart and honorable Chan, Charlie, is called in to rush down to the mansion of mystery and solve the case. Well, okay, “rush” is perhaps a bit too strong. “Saunter” might be more accurate, if it’s a really, really deliberate gait. Chan doesn’t show up until 11 minutes into the 66 min. picture, and – as with the previous film in the series, Black Magic – that’s a good thing.

Mantan Moreland’s Birmingham Brown is back as Charlie’s chauffer, and we’re introduced to Chan Son #4, Eddie, played by Edwin Luke, who I assume was Keye’s untalented brother. The corpses in this picture are less stiff than Son #4. In any case, par for the course for this type of film, the entire family hated the scientist and had reasons for wanting him dead, reasons they’re not shy about sharing with Charlie. Because of the thinness of the plot, we’re given a third comic relief figure, a homespun sheriff who was intended to be folksy but who instead comes across as brain damaged.

Once again, Chan’s Chanisms are kept to a minimum (“To get info from him is like putting empty bucket into empty well”).

Speaking of the murderer, I would have no qualms or trepidations about telling you who the killer is, because (a) you wouldn’t believe me, and (B) you wouldn’t understand what I was trying to tell you. Suffice to say that, had they revealed the killer to be Eleanor Roosevelt, it would’ve made no less sense.

Four Chan films in the Chanthology box down, two more to go. “Watching collection of Charlie Chan movies like eating box of chocolates with toothache: pain will linger after last one is gone.”

Of the six Charlie Chan films included in the Chanthology boxed DVD set, The Scarlet Clue (1945) was rated the lowest by Chan fans in their 2004 online poll. Oddly enough, I found it to be easily the most entertaining of the five Chans I’ve watched so far, although I can see why Chanatics might not like it.

A couple of aged detectives are trailing a nervous character on a dark, foggy waterfront. Surprising, Charlie Chan appears (Monogram usually kept him off-screen for the first reel) and chides the men for tailing the character; he only wanted the man to be located, not alerted to the fact that he was being followed (odd, considering Charlie’s “undercover” garb on a stake-out is his usual blazing white suit and giant white bowler hat). Anyway, before our astute team of Sherlocks can pick up their suspect, he sure does get killed.

Turns out the guy was involved in a plot to steal radar secrets, and Charlie follows a rather obvious clue to a radio station that just happens to share office space with the radar laboratory. A-ha! But which one of the ham radio actors (well, they’re wireless radio actors, but you know what I mean) is the killer?

The plot itself is terrible, the killer is revealed very early in the picture, Chan has no detectiving to do, and the mastermind behind it all is never unmasked by Chan, but instead simply blunders into a death trap previously set for the Honolulu Lulu. So why is this the best film of the Monogram series? Because Chan is reduced to pretty much a moving prop, and the film revolves around all the comic relief characters. I started to keep track of them all, but I think I lost count.

Heading the list is Mantan Moreland as the always-noivous Birmingham Brown, who has graduated in the series so far from hack driver to chauffer to now a full-fledged “Second Assistant” to Mr. Chan (I guess by the end of the series, he’ll be playing “Son #5, Jefferson Davis Chan” or somesuch). Mantan’s vaudeville partner, Ben Carter, pops up out of nowhere and the two of them perform a hilarious patter routine that’s so funny they reprise it late in the picture. Next comes Benson Fong, back as Son #3, Tommy Chan, and mainly serves as a foil for Mantan. The cast of radio hams includes Jack Norton, famous film drunk in an assortment of comedies of the ‘30s, doing his drunk bit here. There’s Leonard Mudie as Horace Karlos(!), a Shakespearean ack-tor who brings a lot of gusto to radio soap opera. You’ll also find two catty actresses, a viciously bitchy station owner, and a Swedish maid who says things like (are you ready for this?) “Yumpin’ Yiminy!”

Two of the set pieces figure large in the film; one is a “testing tunnel” in the radar laboratory; it’s a steam room at one end and a refrigerated ice box at the other, and you can bet that Tommy Chan and Birmingham Brown blunder into it. The other is an elevator that has a trapdoor controlled by the mystery mastermind; you’d think that, after Chan and Company barely survive their peril by plummeting they’d take the stairs, but no, they have no qualms about getting in that elevator again, the ninnies.

Speaking of the radar lab, believe it or not, the equipment that powers the “radar” is all of the various spark-makers from Bride of Frankenstein (1935)! I dunno what it was doing on the Monogram lot, but it sure is guffaw-inducing in this context.

Two other notes, even though I’m sure by this point in the review I’m down here talking to myself. This is the first of the Chanthology DVDs to be missing the original Monogram title card; it says “Anglo-Amalgamated Film Distributors (Ltd.) presents Charlie Chan in ‘The Scarlet Clue’” and then cuts to the original credit cards. Also, well-known character actor I. Stanford Jolley has a major role in this film as the station manager, and he’s not even listed in the credits. I guess he pissed somebody off in the Monogram offices, or else they simply forgot about him.

This film was so entertaining (in that cheerfully cheap Monogram kind of way) that I’m actually kind of sorry there’s only one more film to go in the set. Kind of.

For the sixth Monogram installment, The Shanghai Cobra (1945), director Phil Rosen (who had helmed the first five less-than-stellar pictures) was occupied elsewhere (specifically, he’d been assigned to punch up the new Monogram Cisco Kid series, and when you are counting on Phil Rosen to improve a series for you, brother, have YOU got troubles). In any case, it turned out to be a not unfortuitous circumstance, because director Phil Karson (who would go on to make The Phenix City Story and Kansas City Confidential) stepped in and turned out a nice, suspenseful film. (Unfortunately, Monogram writer George Callahan wasn’t booted out of the series with Rosen, but you can’t have everything.)

Four employees of the Sixth National Bank have been poisoned with cobra venom, and the police can’t crack the case (the chief actually says, “There is no connection between the victims!” even though they all work in the same bank) and so call in honorable Chan, Charlie, and his two assistants, Tommy Chan (Benson “Son #3” Fong) and Birmingham Brown (Mantan “I’m kinda tired of Monogram callin’ me in to try and save their asses in movie after movie” Moreland).

It seems that several years earlier in Shanghai, Charlie had arrested a murderer and jewel thief named Jan Van Horne, who had later escaped. Van Horne had apparently used cobra venom to kill his prior victims, and so he becomes a suspect in this new series of crimes, even though he’s had plastic surgery and nobody knows what he looks like. The bank president is also a suspect, as is the vice president, the security guard, the secretary, one of the switchboard operators, a private detective that’s in love with the secretary, a chemical engineer who has an office in the bank, a lady that works in the laundry down the street, the proprietor of the diner on the corner, two guys who seem to have stumbled onto the set out of nowhere and who carry bags of powerful explosives in their suit pockets, and the lady that lives inside the juke box (don’t ask). Oh, yeah, and there’s radium in the bank’s vault and a “certain foreign power” would pay big bucks to get it, so if you get tired of keeping track of all the murder suspects, you can always amuse yourself with that for awhile.

These plots are always so silly, and Charlie Chan himself is always so boring, that I found myself again waiting for the comedy bits. This time, there’s an Abbott & Costello routine between Tommy and Birmingham; it seems Birmingham got a ticket for making an illegal U-turn (“I asked should I go straight, and you said no, you turn here.” “Yes, I said ‘No u-turn here’”). I’m not quite certain why Chan keeps these two around, if not simply for amusement; when Tommy says, “Want a suggestion, Pop?” Charlie’s quick retort is “No.” (And oddly enough, when Tommy and Birmingham are hurt in an explosion late in the film, Charlie calls out “Birmingham!” before he calls out “Tommy!” I guess he knew where Monogram’s bread was buttered.) A couple of other notes: this Chan installment seems a little higher-budgeted than the previous ones; there’s a flashback, an impressive bank set (with vault), and a rain-swept street. Whether this was the new director, the fact that this was the first post-war Chan, or maybe returns had been good and Monogram decided to kick in a little more dough, I don’t know, but it was certainly appreciated by this reporter. Oh, and for the second Chan film in a row, a well-recognized character actor has a major part sans credit listing: this time it’s George Chandler as Joe, the diner owner (you’d recognize him if you saw him).

The Shanghai Cobra is the sixth and last of the Charlie Chan films in the Chantology DVD boxed set. I rank it third on the Gravy Chanometer, behind The Scarlet Clue and Black Magic (Meeting at Midnight). There doesn’t seem much chance that MGM will release additional Chan titles, but one never knows, does one?
"I'm glad that this question came up, because there are so many ways to answer it that one of them is bound to be right." - Robert Benchley
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Sgt Saturn
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I can remember a local TV station showing a Charlie Chan movie every Friday night at 10:30 or 11:00. I think I saw most of them. I understand that CC is no longer politically correct, but I still have fond memories of Warner Oland and Sidney Toler.

The Ol' Sarge
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rhomak
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Has anybody heard about the possibility of a new Chan franchise. I heard of the
possibility of a new Chan movie with a twist. Lucy Liu is said to be playing the
grand-daughter of the legendary detective. <_<
I don't think this such a good idea, but considering some of the dreck coming out
of Hollywood lately, I wouldn't put it past them to throw this film at us.

rhomak :D
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igsjr
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Gravy--which Oland Chans are available in England? This sounds like something worthy of an investment.
"Life is in color--but black-and-white is more realistic..." -- Samuel Fuller, director

So many DVDs...so little time...
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The Batman
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This is what IMDB has on that proposed Granddaughter Chan movie, starring Lucy Liu:

Charlie Chan (2007)
Writing credits
Dan McDermott

Genre: Adventure / Crime / Thriller

Plot Outline: The granddaughter of a renowned detective makes a name for herself in the world of crime busting.

Production Notes/Status: Announced
Comments:
Status Updated: 27 July 2005
Note: Since this project is categorized as being in production, the data is subject to change; some data could be removed completely.

Can't wait to see how bad this one will be. -_-
Always be yourself! Unless you can be Batman...then always be Batman!
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Inspector Duff
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Favorite Chan - Oland
Favorite films - Black Camel & Charlie Chan on Broadway

The Fox Chans and Universal Holmes are my favorite mystery series. The lead actors brought their own unique style to the roles and claimed them for their own. I also like the repetory company of supporting players that showed up in these movies. A lot of Chan fans don't like Harold Huber, but I do. There's something about a familiar face showing up time and time again that makes watching these films seem like spending time with old friends. Sounds corny, I know.

The Monogram Chans are definitely a mixed bag. I don't think they're the dreck that some do, but they spend far less time in my DVD player than the Foxes although the first several Winters films are quite enjoyable.

As far as the new Lucy Liu movie is concerned, if it puts more pressure on the cowards at Fox to release their Chan films, I'm all for it.

igsjr - I'm not Gravy, but I've not heard good things about the England Chan DVDs (framing issues, poor source prints, etc.) This is a case where the grey market would be a better alternative.
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KanSmiley
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I was wondering if anyone will ever attempt to put out ALL the Chan movies in a restored boxed set. Since Turner tried to show some of the Chan movies last year and the Asian community in San Francisco raised such a ruckus perhaps that is a dead issue.
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Laughing Gravy
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Well, the various Chan series are owned by different companies. It was Fox, not Turner, that cancelled its Chanfest after complaints, but I think they got more complaints for cancelling it than they'd gotten for scheduling it. So who knows?
"I'm glad that this question came up, because there are so many ways to answer it that one of them is bound to be right." - Robert Benchley
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panzer the great & terrible
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Management at Fox is, koff koff, a wee bit different from management at Turner. They treat opinions as facts over there. If you can't distinguish fact from opinion, people's opinions get to be kinda important. Anyway, I think that's why the Fox folks are such worry warts.
Life is just a bowl of cherries, it's too mysterious, don't take it serious...
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HGB3
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My wife and I recently finished watching all the available Chans (save Eran Trece) on an approximately weekly basis. As seems to be the case with most Chan fans, we definitely like Oland best. My favorite probably is “Charlie Chan at the Opera,” but I like many.

We do enjoy the Toler flicks (even the entries made at Monogram, although Mantan Moreland is definitely the highlight of several of those), but at times his sarcastic comments regarding his offspring comes off as a little too mean. Neither of us particularly warmed to Roland Winters in the role, in part because his Chan no longer seemed to be a policeman at all, but just a run-of-the-mill detective.

I’m glad we watched all of the movies, but I think that the later films show their weakness much more clearly when seen so quickly in succession, especially just after the better, earlier entries. (However, the repetitiveness was less burdensome than in the -- better in some respects -- Boston Blackie movies, which we couldn’t bring ourselves to watch all together.) I expect that when we begin watching them all again, we will break up the series with other detective films in the rotation as well, so that we watch no more than two in one month.

Harry
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Tal Chotali
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Before AMC went off the deep end they ran a number of the Chan films in a marathon. I taped most of them, but unfortunately the reception from our cable system was less than perfect. When Fox announced that they were going to show the "restored" Chans I came very close to taping over or discarding the AMC Chans. Fortunately, I still have the AMC Chans, but have felt nothing but contempt for the spineless :blink: that program Fox Movie Channel.

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Black Tiger
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Rupert Murdoch, head of Fox, being married to an Asian woman may have had some influence on the decision to ax Chan.
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Inspector Carr
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A couple of years back, there was a proposed tv series updating the Chan mythology (around the time of the AMC broadcasts) starring the actor Russel Wong similar to the Lucy Liu character he would be the Grandson in fact they were going to have a picture of Warner Oland on his wall and possibly Keye Luke (Egads Warner's a swede!!! the horror the horror)
"Life is a Crapshoot however you need a pair of dice to participate"
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Inspector Duff
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I suppose most of you have already seen this, but for those who haven't.....

On the mystery board, one of the regulars has posted info indicating that Fox is finally going to start releasing the Chans and Motos next year. Additional information posted on the Chan board indicated that the plan is to release 4 films at a time every few months. It looks like all the Motos and the Oland Chans will be out in 2006. The logical guess is that the Toler Chans will follow in 2007.

As far as I know, Fox has yet to make an official announcement about these.
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Sgt King
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Could you please supply the web site for "The Mystery Board?"
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