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I Married a Monster from Outer Space (1958)
Topic Started: Oct 18 2005, 10:07 AM (585 Views)
Laughing Gravy
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I Married a Monster from Outer Space (1958) Dir. Gene Fowler, Jr.
Released by Paramount Pictures
78 min. / B&W / 1:85:1
On DVD from Paramount

ITB Strange Science Cinema #140

Tom Tryon and Gloria Talbott are about to be married, but Tom is stopped by a nasty-looking alien while on the way back from his bachelor party (hey, at least the creature didn't pop out of a cake) and is sucked into a glowing black cloud! That makes him late for his wedding, but it's okay 'cause it's not really him anyhow, it's a space monster that just LOOKS like him, except when lightning flashes. Then he looks like the space monster again. Anyway, the monster has absorbed Tom's memories, except he doesn't know where his car's headlight switch is. Which matters not, since the space alien can see in the dark (although, later on, when we see inside the spaceship, the interior of the craft has floodlights all over it. Hmmmm).

As the months roll on, Gloria begins to fret over the fact that she and Tom have no children, and consults a doctor, who shows her an x-ray of her hip and explains that this clearly shows that she should have no trouble conceiving a child. Also, Tom has stopped drinking and sells insurance. So Gloria follows him to his spaceship.

Letís just skip to the chase: the aliens are taking over the menfolk and trying to impregnate women because all the women on their planet died. Well, no wonder, on a planet of non-drinking insurance salesmen - they must've been bored to death. The space guys, who have yet to figure out a way to actually impregnate earth gals ("Wait -- my WHAT goes WHERE?!?!?") forget to take over the town doctor, however, and Gloria convinces him of the reality of the situation. He then walks into the hospital's maternity ward and recruits the 20 guys he finds standing there pacing around in anticipation for their children to be born, deducing that since they've, um, managed to perform nature's little miracle of whoopie, they can't be space aliens. Only 20 guys? Must be a slow night in the maternity ward.

In the end, the dads-to-be and the doctor attack the ship with their German shepherds and battle the space aliens to the death.

This movie's one of my favorites. It should be mandatory wedding-night viewing for all Balcony newlyweds.

Ms. Talbott is very sexy in a 1950ish, pointed brassiere, razor-thin eyebrows kind of way, and Mr. Tryon shows why he soon gave up acting to be a writer. And Pernell Roberts is in here someplace, and since Gene "I Was a Teenage Werewolf" Fowler directed, one has to wonder if some producer friend of his didn't call him up and say, "Gene, we're casting a new TV show called Bonanza and still need to fill the roles of two of the Cartwright sons. Any ideas?"

Million-dollar Dialog:
"I'll say one thing for humans: they may not be very bright and their bodies fall apart in a ridiculously short period of time, but they DO manage to enjoy themselves."

The best things about the movie are (a) its crisp black-and-white photography; it looks terrific, much better than most low budget films of the time; and (b) the special effects, which for once are actually special! The black clouds which envelope the men are suitably creepy, and the space aliens, despite the fact that they seem to have ping-pong balls in their mouths, are genuinely scary (they even glow in the dark!).

Also on the Program

Episode 12 of The Shadow, three Porky Pig cartoons, and the coming attractions for next week's two-million-dollar double feature: Missile to the Moon and Frankenstein's Daughter! Wowdy-wow-wow!
"I'm glad that this question came up, because there are so many ways to answer it that one of them is bound to be right." - Robert Benchley
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Inspector Carr
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You know there was a cable version made in the 1990's that actually was not that bad,
"Life is a Crapshoot however you need a pair of dice to participate"
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andarius
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Good film - Gloria was always good to watch - Tom was 'Texas John Slaughter'!
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Frank Hale
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Fantastic film.

I wonder if Maxie Rosenbloom ever thought he would wind up in something like this.

Regrettably, once I learned Tom Tryon was an insurance salesman, I couldnít stop thinking of that scene in "Bananas" where an agent is sent down to torture prisoners by trying to sell them a policy. (Dick Cheney obviously never saw either of these pix.)
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panzer the great & terrible
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I've always loved this movie. The battle of the sexes with a V-8 engine. Fun and funny.
Life is just a bowl of cherries, it's too mysterious, don't take it serious...
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Frank Hale
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Hadn't really thought about that angle so much, but, yes, you're completely on target.

Apart from the general silliness, what especially got my attention was the whole ludicrous idea of a big studio production featuring space aliens invading the America of "Leave It To Beaver" and giant car fins.

Can't remember if pix like "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and "Not of This Earth" were there first in showing that particular TV-America microcosm, but I found this film amusingly ahead of the curve, if only inadvertently, and if only in retrospect.
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panzer the great & terrible
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Well, it was a lot of laughs when it came out. In the Fifties, my crowd had a vague idea that something was amiss with society, and this movie validated that feeling in a MAD magazine sort of way.

There was a book a few years earlier called "I Married a Communist." Wish I could find a copy. Bet it's as silly as it sounds.
Life is just a bowl of cherries, it's too mysterious, don't take it serious...
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Laughing Gravy
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I rewatched I married a Monster.
"I'm glad that this question came up, because there are so many ways to answer it that one of them is bound to be right." - Robert Benchley
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Frank Hale
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Great news.

But are we talking movies or politics?
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