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The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947)
Topic Started: Jan 30 2017, 07:05 AM (163 Views)
Laughing Gravy
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The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947) Dir. Joseph Mankiewicz
Twentieth Century Fox
104 min. / B&W / 1.33:1

'long about 1900 or so, the Widow Muir moves away from her horrid in-laws into a remote seaside cottage, Gull House, with her young daughter, only to find that the place is haunted by the profane sea captain who died there (he kicked the gas on with his foot while sleeping, it seems). The two become first tolerant of each other, then friends, then fall in love, but being in as he's disembodied and all it's not a good deal for him, so she moves on to George Sanders, who - oily though he may be - at least is breathing (the minimum standard by which many women judge the men they choose). That's not the end of the story, though, of the Ghost and Mrs. Muir, as it turns out.

One of my all-time favorite romantic pictures, a real charmer with gorgeous cinematography (although at no time will you think that's not exactly what it is, the Monterrey coast subbing for England). Gene Tierney is as gorgeous as ever (who would've thought those turn-of-the-century outfits could be so sexy?), Rex Harrison is perfect at the quick-to-anger Captain Gregg, and li'l Natalie Wood is the daughter and George Sanders is the snake.

Million-dollar Dialog:
Mrs. Muir to the hot-tempered captain: "I only hope that when I reach the afterlife, I have a little more dignity!"

The lovely (very!) Blu-ray from Fox has two sets of commentary and a trailer. Highly recommended; a wonderful fantasy-romance.

"I'm glad that this question came up, because there are so many ways to answer it that one of them is bound to be right." - Robert Benchley
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Frank Hale
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Very nice film. It's interesting, to me at least, that a few ultra-romantic movies like this one and Portrait of Jennie still managed to get made in the era of film noir and HUAC.

You didnít mention the music, but IMO it's one of Bernard Herrmann's best scores.

Best line for me was "You're trying to give me a hint. Has it something to do with ice?"
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CliffClaven
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Unnecessary trivium: Edward Mulhare, who succeeded Rex Harrison on Broadway in "My Fair Lady", played the Rex Harrison part in the television version of "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir".

I was fond of that show for a while. In the first season, it was "classy" -- no laugh track -- and I thought Hope Lange was cute. For the second and last season, it moved to another network, added a laugh track and dumbed down a bit. Oddly, about the same time "Get Smart" changed networks and gave Max and 99 twins as a ratings stunt.
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mort bakaprevski
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Frank Hale
Jan 31 2017, 01:00 PM
You didnít mention the music, but IMO it's one of Bernard Herrmann's best scores.
It was Herrmann's favorite score.
"Nov Shmoz Ka Pop."
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Frank Hale
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I think I knew that somewhere along the line, but in any case it doesnít surprise me a bit. It was always pretty clear to me that Mr. Herrmann was just another frustrated idealist/romantic who hated having to deal with Philistines.

Tiomkin's favorite was "I Confess", and Korngold's "Between Two Worlds" IIRC. Same thing going on I imagine.

Any idea what Steiner's or Newman's was?


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