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Love & Death: The Story of Bonnie & Clyde (1995)
Topic Started: May 23 2017, 04:53 PM (225 Views)
Laughing Gravy
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Love & Death: The Story of Bonnie & Clyde (1995) Produced for the TV series Biography

Revisited this because Bonnie Parker & Clyde Barrow met their fate on May 23, 1934, and because my girlfriend is appearing on stage in a musical version(!) of the story, opening this week.

Dirt-poor Texans (she's 19 and married for the past 4 years, he's 20) meet and fall in love and hit the highways a-blastin' away at any copper what gets in their path. A couple of years later, betrayed by the father of a gang member, they run into an ambush in Louisiana.

Through more than one movie, we're basically familiar with the story: Clyde's older brother Buck and his wife, daughter of a preacher, are along for much of the ride. Usually romanticized in the movies, these two strike me as being horrible human beings, frankly, even as criminals go (Dillinger said they give bank robbin' a bad name, although they rarely robbed banks, preferring groceries and gas stations).

The pair's story is told via interviews with surviving family members and re-enacted footage from a film made in 1934 that I sure would like to see. Oh, and actors reading letters the two wrote to each other.

Million-dollar Dialog:
"I know you can't ever live in Dallas, honey, because you can't live down the awful name you've got here. But sugar you could go somewhere else and get a job if you want. I want you to be a man, honey, and not a thug. I know you are good and I know you can make good." - from a letter from Bonnie Parker to Clyde Barrow.

Very well done show, actually. More on Bonnie and Clyde in the Balcony.
"I'm glad that this question came up, because there are so many ways to answer it that one of them is bound to be right." - Robert Benchley
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BeckyBoop
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Laughing Gravy
May 23 2017, 04:53 PM
Posted Image

Love & Death: The Story of Bonnie & Clyde (1995) Produced for the TV series Biography

Revisited this because Bonnie Parker & Clyde Barrow met their fate on May 23, 1934, and because my girlfriend is appearing on stage in a musical version(!) of the story, opening this week.

Dirt-poor Texans (she's 19 and married for the past 4 years, he's 20) meet and fall in love and hit the highways a-blastin' away at any copper what gets in their path. A couple of years later, betrayed by the father of a gang member, they run into an ambush in Louisiana.

Through more than one movie, we're basically familiar with the story: Clyde's older brother Buck and his wife, daughter of a preacher, are along for much of the ride. Usually romanticized in the movies, these two strike me as being horrible human beings, frankly, even as criminals go (Dillinger said they give bank robbin' a bad name, although they rarely robbed banks, preferring groceries and gas stations).

The pair's story is told via interviews with surviving family members and re-enacted footage from a film made in 1934 that I sure would like to see. Oh, and actors reading letters the two wrote to each other.

Million-dollar Dialog:
"I know you can't ever live in Dallas, honey, because you can't live down the awful name you've got here. But sugar you could go somewhere else and get a job if you want. I want you to be a man, honey, and not a thug. I know you are good and I know you can make good." - from a letter from Bonnie Parker to Clyde Barrow.

Very well done show, actually. More on Bonnie and Clyde in the Balcony.
Thank you for the reminder to watch this!

Cumie Barrow: Clyde Barrow, look what you've done! I hope you know how to lay eggs!
Clyde Barrow: I hope you know how to fry chicken!
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